Plant Index: A-Z List of Common Houseplants

Need to find a little bit of information on your new houseplant? Look no further! Here is a list of the most common houseplants, including their scientific names, basic care requirements and more.

Air Plants

Tillandsia spp.
Tillandsia ionantha

Super simple to care for, air plants look lovely when hung in hanging arrangements or anchored to driftwood. Just be sure to keep these little plants in bright, indirect sunlight and mist them occasionally, if you keep them in humidity-poor environments.

Blooming only once in their lifetimes, air plants make up for it by producing incredibly vibrant flowers. After flowering, air plants will usually die back but will produce a few baby air plants, which are sometimes referred to as “pups.”

Toxicity: Non-Toxic

Light Level: Bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

African Violet

Saintpaulia spp.
African violet

African violets are known for their cheerful blooms in white, pink and purple, as well as their thick, fuzzy leaves. Preferring bright, indirect light, keep your violets out of direct sunlight, which can cause leaf burn, and avoid drafty windows too.

To prevent leaf spotting, water your African violets from the bottom, being careful to avoid getting moisture on their sensitive leaves. For happier plants, pot up your violets in a soil specially formulated for their needs and fertilize them every four to six weeks with a liquid African violet fertilizer. To prevent root rot, only water your plants when the soil feels dry to the touch; however, drier soil can encourage your plants to flower.

Toxicity: Non-Toxic

Light Level: Bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

Alocasia

Alocasia spp.
Alocasia Amazonica ‘Polly’

Alocasia are popular plants, and with good reason.  With large, glossy leaves (which can grow up to 3’ long, depending on the variety) and highly structural forms, alocasia look like the tropics.

Naturally growing on the forest floor in the humid, tropical forests of Asia and eastern Australia, alocasia grow via tuberous rhizomes, rather than roots.  Preferring slightly drier soil, alocasia enjoy a little extra humidity, which can help ward off their most common pests: spider mites.

If you like alocasia, try out some of the most coveted varieties, such as ‘African Mask,’ ‘Amazonica,’ ‘Zebrina,’ ‘Pink Dragon’ and ‘Jewel.’

Toxicity: Toxic

Light Level: Bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

Aloe

Aloe vera
Aloe Vera Plant

While there are over 500 different species of aloe, Aloe vera is the most commonly variety, which is prized for its ability to moisturize and soothe skin burns.

With large, fleshy leaves covered in tiny spines, aloe adds a nice, architectural element to window displays and houseplant collections.  As a succulent, however, less tends to be more with aloes, as overwatering is the single easiest way to kill this plant. 

Be sure to plant your aloe in a well-draining soil suitable for succulents and cacti and allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.  Aloe can go several weeks to several months without watering; however, if your aloe’s leaves start to feel a bit flat, your plant could use a drink.

Toxicity: Toxic

Light Level: Bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

Amaryllis

Hippeastrum spp.
Amaryllis

Frequently sold around Christmastime, when grown as a houseplant, amaryllis typically blooms in November or December when their bold, pink, red or white flowers make showstopping displays.

Amaryllis grow from bulbs, rather than roots, and can temporarily be grown in water — just be sure the bulb itself is not submerged.  For happier plants, pot up your amaryllis in a rich, well-draining soil and fertilize it ever few weeks with a balanced liquid fertilizer. 

When properly maintained, amaryllis can live for 25 or more years and generally improves with age, producing more blooms as it grows older.

Toxicity: Toxic

Light Level: Medium to bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

Anthurium

Anthurium andraeanum
Anthurium flower

Another stunning tropical flower with big bold blooms, anthurium, also known as flamingo flower, is just the sort of houseplant that works great as a centerpiece on a coffee table or on a bright kitchen counter.

With flowers that come in a range of colors, including red, purple, black, orange, pink and blue, anthurium’s glossy leaves also add to their appeal.  Despite their exotic look, these low maintenance plants adapt easily to all sorts of lighting, including low lighting; however, plants may produce fewer flowers in inadequate lighting.

Requiring only minimal fertilizer, feed your anthurium every three to four months with a quarter-strength liquid fertilizer and avoid overwatering your plants to prevent root rot.

Toxicity: Toxic

Light Level: Low to bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

Arrowhead Vine

Syngonium podophyllum
Syngonium podophyllum

If you don’t think you have much of a “green thumb,” give arrowhead vines a try.  They may just change your mind.

These easy-care plants adapt nicely to many different situations, including rooms with low humidity and low lighting.  Growing up to 6’ long as houseplants, arrowhead vines come in a range of colors from white to green to dusty pink.

Allow your arrowhead to trail over its planter edge for a wilder look or try propping it up and pruning it well for a more upright growth habit. If you love arrowheads, there’s more good news: they easily propagate in water. That means you can grow lots of new plants from just a few cuttings!

Toxicity: Toxic

Light Level: Low to bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Easy

Asparagus Fern

Asparagus aethiopicus
Asparagus aethiopicus

Despite its name, asparagus fern is not actually a fern at all, but is more closely related to asparagus or lilies, depending on who’s doing the classifying.

With bushy, feathery-looking foliage, asparagus fern begs to be touched, but be careful of the small thorns that line its stems.  Looking lovely in hanging baskets, asparagus ferns love humidity and can grow up to 6’ tall when properly cared for. 

A great choice for humid bathrooms, if you choose to keep your asparagus fern in less humid environments, try to give it an occasional misting to prevent leaf drop.

Toxicity: Toxic

Light Level: Medium to bright, indirect light

Care Difficulty: Moderate

Avocado Tree

Persea americana
Persea americana

If you want to grow an unusual houseplant, try keeping an avocado tree.  When grown outdoors, avocado trees can exceed 60’ tall; however, as houseplants, they are much more diminutive, rarely growing above 10’.

Preferring infrequent deep watering and bright light, avocado trees do best when fertilized on occasion with a balanced fertilizer suitable for citrus trees. 

While you can often buy avocado trees at local nurseries, you can start your own from an avocado pit.  For quicker germination rates, place your pit in a nutrient-rich compost or, if you have one, a worm bin, which can encourage your pit to sprout very quickly.

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Baby Jade Plant

Portulacaria afra
Portulacaria afra dwarf jade plant

Hailing from South Africa, the baby jade plant, also commonly known by its nickname “elephant bush,” makes up a significant portion of the diet of certain species of rhinoceros and elephants.

Growing up to 15’ tall in the wild, as a houseplant the baby jade is often much smaller, though its dark stems and tiny leaves make it quite irresistible.  As a succulent, baby jades do best when given a thorough, drenching watering before allowing the soil to dry out completely.  Available in both solid green and variegated varieties, this easy care plant is a must have for fans of succulents.

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Banana Leaf Fig

Ficus alii
Ficus alii

Closely related to the weeping fig and fiddle leaf fig, the banana leaf fig is a less temperamental species that is less inclined to drop its leaves when environmental conditions aren’t quite right.

Named for its slender, banana-shaped leaves, banana leaf figs can grow up to 10’ tall as houseplants.  Originally from southeast Asia, India and China, these plants do best when exposed to bright, indirect light and provided with consistently moist, but not soggy, soil.

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Bird’s Nest Fern

Asplenium nidus
Asplenium nidus

Also known as the “crispy wave” fern, bird’s nest ferns are known for their vibrant green, smooth leaves with wavy edges.

While bird’s nest ferns love moisture and humidity like all ferns do, avoid watering the center of this species as it can cause rot.

More tolerant of lower light situations than many other ferns, bird’s nest ferns are a highly adaptable species that can thrive in any space, from a low light room to a windowsill brimming with bright, indirect light.  Just place your fern on a pebble tray or mist it occasionally and you should have a charming houseplant for years to come.

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Boston Fern

Nephrolepis exaltata
Nephrolepis exaltata

If you love ferns, Boston ferns’ luxurious, dense foliage is hard to beat.  Growing up to 3’ tall by 3’ wide, Boston ferns are some of the larger ferns you can grow as houseplants and they add vibrant color and a classic feel to any décor.

Growing best in bright, indirect light, too much lighting can cause leaf burn, while too little lighting may cause your fern to produce spindly leaves, so try to find a happy balance.  Requiring high humidity of 80% or higher, achieving the proper indoor humidity levels can be difficult when keeping this species.  However, adding a humidifier to your setup or keeping your Boston fern in a steamy bathroom can do wonders.

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Bromeliad

Guzmania Rana
bromeliads Guzmania Rana

These brightly colored beauties are prized for their vibrant blooms that come in yellow, pink and red.  Growing naturally as epiphytes, bromeliads get much of the moisture they need from the air, so they do have a tendency to enjoy a bit more moisture than average household humidity levels.

Blooming once in their lives, bromeliads will typically die back after blooming; however, they may produce a “pup,” or baby bromeliad, before doing so.  Feed your bromeliad occasionally with a liquid, orchid fertilizer and ensure your bromeliad has adequate airflow to prevent fungus.

Coming in both solid and variegated varieties, for a bigger impact and more color, try adding several bromeliads to your houseplant display.

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Burro’s Tail

Sedum morganianum
Sedum morganianum

An unusual looking succulent with long trailing stems, the fleshy leaves of burro’s tail have an interesting texture that almost looks as if they were woven together.  Coming in gray-green to blueish-green coloration, burro’s tale is easy care and looks particularly charming when placed in a hanging basket.

Drought and heat-tolerant, burro’s tail is often kept indoors, but can be moved outside under a sheltered patio in the warmer months to give it a bit more sunshine.  Even better?  Burro’s tail propagates easily so you’ll soon have plenty of plants to share.

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Cast Iron Plant

Aspidistra elatior
Aspidistra elatior

Cast iron plants, as the name implies, are known for being incredibly hardy, adaptable plants that can grow well in almost any situation, including rooms with low light.

Native to Japan and Taiwan, cast iron plant’s rich foliage can add a nice pop of color to your room; however, if you’re expecting flowers, be advised that these forgiving plants are unlikely to bloom when kept as houseplants.

Non-toxic to pets, cast iron plants will grow 2 to 3’ tall and can live over 25 years when properly maintained.

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China Doll Plant

Radermachera sinica
Radermachera sinica

China doll plants may not be one of the best-known houseplants, but that’s not their fault!  Gorgeous China dolls offer vibrant green, lacy foliage that is guaranteed to lend an exotic feel to any room.

While often sold as small, tabletop plants, China dolls can grow quite tall, reaching up to 8’ tall in a relatively short period of time.  Although China dolls rarely bloom indoors, when kept as outdoor specimens, they will grow large, white trumpet-shaped flowers.

Although these plants have simple care requirements, they do tend to attract pests, like spider mites and scale, so be sure to inspect your plant on occasion. 

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Chinese Croton

Excoecaria cochinchinensis
Excoecaria cochinchinensis

A foliage plant that grows up to 18” tall, Chinese croton can add lots of color to your houseplant collection with its variegated white and green leaves that are accentuated by their bright pink undersides.

An easy-care plant, Chinese croton prefers moderate, regular waterings and higher than normal humidity.  While suitable for medium light rooms, if your Chinese croton leaves begin to turn green, it’s a clear indication that your plant could use a bit more light.

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Chinese Evergreen

Aglaonema spp.
Aglaonema

Coming in both solid green and variegated varieties, Chinese evergreen plants are super low maintenance, but they pack a punch.

Growing up to 4’ tall as houseplants, keep your Chinese evergreens away from drafts as they can cause leaf damage.  Drought and heat-tolerant, this adaptable species can adjust to low light situations making it a great choice for rooms you might not necessarily think to keep houseplants in.  

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Christmas Cactus

Schlumbergera spp.
Schlumbergera truncata

Christmas cactus is actually a succulent that blooms large, tropical-looking flowers from November to January in colors that range from white and yellow to pink and red.

With fleshy, segmented leaves, Christmas cactus is an easy-care plant that propagates well in soil and water.  Plant your Christmas cactus in soil suitable for cacti and succulents and provide infrequent waterings, allowing your plant’s soil to dry out thoroughly in between.

Because this succulent grows long, trailing stems, try planting it in a hanging basket for a beautiful display.

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Coffee Plant

Coffea arabica
Coffea arabica

If you love a morning cup of Joe, why not try growing your own coffee plant?  Native to Ethiopia, this plant blooms tiny white flowers in spring that eventually ripen into black pods with two coffee beans per pod.  Growing 1 to 2’ tall as a houseplant, coffee plants prefer slightly acidic soil and regular waterings, approximately once a week.

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Coleus

Solenostemon scutellarioides
Solenostemon scutellarioides

Like crotons, coleus are commonly grown as outdoor ornamental annuals, but they make great houseplants too.  Featuring a range of bright colors in their patterned foliage, never allow your coleus’ soil to dry out completely but keep it consistently moist, not soggy, throughout the year.  Preferring high humidity, place your coleus on a pebble tray or in a bright, steamy bathroom to keep it looking its best.

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Corn Plant

Dracaena fragrans
Dracaena Fragrans

Growing up to 6’ tall as a houseplant, the easy-care corn plant comes in both solid and variegated varieties. While often sold as a small, tabletop plant, mature corn plants can look quite tree-like with woody stems.

Able to thrive even under poor conditions, this resilient plant will bloom on occasion with clusters of strongly fragrant blooms.

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Creeping Fig

Ficus pumila
Ficus pumila

A member of the mulberry family, this flowering plant is also known as the “climbing fig” for its ability to crawl up vertical surfaces.  Coming in both solid and variegated options, keep your creeping fig in a humid room or mist it frequently as this plant is prone to drying out quite rapidly in arid conditions.

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Croton

Codiaeum variegatum
Codiaeum variegatum

Frequently planted in outdoor arrangements during autumn, crotons are known for their vibrant foliage that comes in a range of bold yellows and splashes of orange and red.

With basic care requirements, crotons prefer regular watering so that soil remains consistently moist, but not soggy.  When well-maintained, certain varieties can grow up to 6’ tall, but be mindful of their sap, which can cause slight skin irritation.

While there are different varieties, ‘Gold Dust’ and ‘Petra’ are crowd favorites.

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Crown of Thorns

Euphorbia milii
Euphorbia milii (crown of thorns)

A flowering member of the spurge family, crown-of-thorns is a particularly beautiful succulent plant, naturally found in Madagascar.  With small bright blooms coming in white, salmon, pink or yellow, this plant is known for its thorny stems which are used in nature as a natural defense mechanism.

Growing up to 6’ tall as a houseplant, crown-of-thorns prefers more water than most succulents, so try to water you plant when the top 1 to 2” of soil feels dry to the touch.

Prone to leaf drop in less than ideal growing situations, such as under- or overwatering, provide your plant with the right conditions and you’ll have a thrilling houseplant for many years to come.

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Cyclamen

Cyclamen persicum
Cyclamen persicum

Pretty little cyclamen, with their bold blooms in white, pink or red, come from rocky hillsides in areas ranging from Turkey to Palestine.

Growing from tubers, cyclamen will at times go dormant, which many houseplant novices may mistake for plant death.  If your cyclamen appears to be dying back, but its tubers are still firm, there’s still hope.  Simply stop watering your plant, place it in a cool, dry place for eight to ten weeks and your cyclamen should begin to regrow.

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Dragon Tree

Dracaena marginata
Dracaena marginata

Growing up to 20’ tall in nature, dragon trees will stay more petite as houseplants, but that doesn’t detract from their charm.  With woody stems and spiky green foliage accentuated by red leaf margins, this houseplant all-star adds a nice structural contrast to vining and softer foliage plants.

A native of Madagascar, dragon trees are drought-tolerant and extremely hardy.  Occasionally, under the right conditions, these plants will bloom small flowers in springtime, but this is rare.

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Dumb Cane

Dieffenbachia spp.
Dumb Cane Dieffenbachia

Named after the unpleasant sensations it creates in your mouth if it’s accidentally ingested, this gorgeous foliage plant features highly contrasting green and white leaves.  Easy to care for, dumb canes can adapt to a wide range of situations, just provide them with lots of bright, indirect light, a regular watering schedule and a good, balanced fertilizer every four to six weeks.

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Elephant Ear

Caladium spp.
Elephant Ear colocasia

As foliage plants, known for their colorful leaves that range from a nearly translucent white to bold reds and greens, elephant ears are often grown as outdoor plants but they double as perfect houseplants too!

Native to central and South America, as houseplants, elephant ears grow to about 3’ tall.  Although uncommon when kept indoors, elephant ears will sometimes bloom a single flower, which ranges in color from white to pinkish-green.  Like many tropical plants, elephant ears need a little boost of humidity, so try placing yours on a pebble tray or near a humidifier.

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Elephant Ear Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe beharensis
Kalanchoe beharensis

Native to Madagascar, elephant ear kalanchoe has soft, silvery leaves with serrated edges that are, at times, slightly folded, like an elephant’s ear.

Also known as the “felt bush,” this drought-tolerant plant requires minimal watering.  Allow your plant’s soil to thoroughly dry out between waterings and, when you water, give your kalanchoe a good, deep drink. 

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Emerald Gem

Homalomena spp.
Leaf of tropical 'Homalomena Rubescens Emerald Gem'

Native to southeast Asia, this low maintenance houseplant is valued for its dark green, waxy, spade-shaped leaves.

A relative of philodendrons, emerald gems need a little more care, as watering issues are the major reason why houseplant enthusiasts may struggle with this plant.  Both over- or underwatering can cause leaf loss, so aim for a happy medium and allow about half of the soil to dry out in between watering.

When kept under the right conditions, your emerald gem may flower a delicate, white bloom.

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Emerald Ripple Peperomia

Peperomia caperata
Peperomia caperata

Emerald ripples come in several different colorings, from a deep green to a dark purple-reddish hue.  Quite easy to maintain, emerald ripples bloom on occasion with flowers that grow in long, slender spikes that are said to resemble a rat’s tail.

With simple needs, try to ensure your emerald ripple is watered regularly, approximately once a week, and reduce waterings a bit during winter.  Simple to propagate, new plant starts can be grown from both stem and leaf cuttings.

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English Ivy

Hedera helix
Hedera helix

English ivy is known for being an outdoor plant which, if left unchecked, can become quite invasive.  As an indoor plant, however, English ivy is much more benign; however, watch its roots as they can destroy drywall or masonry if they begin to climb your walls!

Coming in solid and variegated varieties, as a houseplant, English ivy looks thrilling in a hanging basket or when displayed on a high shelf.  Just be sure to provide your plant with a little bit extra humidity to prevent leaf drying.

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Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus globulus
Eucalyptus globulus

The vapors of eucalyptus are commonly used to relieve cold symptoms, such as nasal congestion, but did you know this helpful species can be grown as a houseplant too?

A native of Australia, there are over 700 different species of eucalyptus, some of which can grow over 150’ tall.  As a houseplant, eucalyptus remains much more compact, rarely reaching sizes above 3’ tall.

Popular indoor varieties include ‘Cider Gum,’ ‘Silver Dollar’ and ‘Alpine Cider Gum.’

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False Aralia

Plerandra elegantissima
Plerandra elegantissima

Native to New Caledonia, false aralia are very forgiving plants that can adapt to a range of indoor conditions.  Commonly sold as tabletop plants, this fast-growing species can easily reach 5 to 6’ in a few years.

Prized for their dark green, slender, serrated leaves, if you notice your false aralia is beginning to drop leaves near the bottom of the plant, it’s a sure sign your plant could use a bit more water.  Aim to create a consistent watering schedule, watering your aralia when the top 1 to 2” of soil is dry to the touch, or approximately once a week during the growing season.

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Fiddle Leaf Fig

Ficus lyrata
Ficus lyrata

Closely related to the weeping fig, fiddle leaf figs are wildly popular houseplants that, when grown as dwarf trees, generally reach around 9’ tall.

Like weeping figs, fiddle leaf figs can be sensitive to environmental changes, so try to maintain consistent watering, humidity and light levels to prevent leaf drop.  Despite their delicate nature, fiddle leaf figs are very lovely plants with large, glossy leaves that are sure to add color and interest to your home.

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Fishbone Cactus

Disocactus anguliger
Epiphyllum anguliger

Also known as the zigzag cactus, fishbone cacti are naturally found in Mexico where they grow as epiphytes in evergreen forests.

As houseplants, fishbone cacti are frequently planted in hanging baskets which allow their long stems to trail nicely.  Easily propagated from stem cuttings, fishbone cacti occasionally bloom large, white or pale yellow, night-blooming flowers that exude a strong fragrance and eventually mature into an edible green fruit.

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Fishtail Palm

Caryota mitis
Caryota mitis

If you’re looking for a unique looking houseplant that your friends likely don’t have in their collection, why not try the fishtail palm?  Named for its fan-shaped leaves that resemble fishtails or gingko leaves, fishtail palms are an interesting species that comes from the tropical regions of southeast Asia.

One of the easiest palms to grow inside, fishtail palms generally grow to about 6’ in height when mature.  Like other palms, if you notice your fishtail’s leaves beginning to turn brown, assess your plant’s moisture levels and consider adding a humidifier or pebble tray to your setup.

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Fizzle Sizzle

Albuca spiralis
Albuca spiralis

Fizzle sizzles are odd little plants sporting curly leaves that sprout from a bulb root.  These eye-catching succulents are easy to care for and guaranteed to spice up your houseplant collection with their unusual form.

Native to South Africa, fizzle sizzle grow up to 8” tall and bloom in early spring with yellow-green flowers that are said to have a strong vanilla fragrance.

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Flame Violet

Episcia cupreata
Episcia cupreata

Named for its bright red blooms, flame violets’ colorful flowers are only accentuated by their showy, highly contrasting leaves.

Native to South America, flame violets are related to African violets and similarly prefer being watered from their base.  As houseplants, their trailing growth habit works well in hanging displays that allow the plants stems to drape in a natural way.

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Friendship Plant

Pilea involucrata
Pilea involucrata

Friendship plant’s highly textured leaves come in a range of colors, from almost neon green to a more muted silvery-tone.  Super easy to propagate, friendship plant is named for the ease with which it can be shared with friends.

A native of central and South America, friendship plants have a trailing growth habit, so consider placing yours in a hanging planter and provide it with a little extra humidity.  Because they do best with higher than normal household humidity levels and remain quite small (under 12” when mature), friendship plants work well in terrariums too.

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Goldfish Plant

Columnea nematanthus
Goldfish plant

With glossy leaves and a long, trailing growth habit, goldfish plants look stunning in hanging displays where their bright orange flowers, which are said to resemble goldfish, can take center stage.

Goldfish plants can be a bit tricky to care for, but it helps to know that they are epiphytes, like orchids, and should be treated as such.  To that end, pot your goldfish plant in a well-draining potting mix suitable for orchids and mist your plant frequently to maintain humidity levels of 50% or above.

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Heart Leaf Fern

Hemionitis arifolia
Hemionitis arifolia

As the name implies, heart leaf ferns are famed for their adorable glossy, heart-shaped leaves.  The first recorded sighting of heart-leaf fern dates back to 1859 when it was first identified in southeast Asia.

A small variety of fern, heart-leaf ferns rarely grow larger than 8” tall, making them well-suited for living in terrariums.  Terrariums work particularly well for this species as it enjoys high humidity levels of above 60%.

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Inchplant

Tradescantia spp.
Tradescantia Zebrina

Also known as spiderworts, inchplants come in many different varieties, some of which make both great houseplants and outdoor landscape plants, depending on your growing zone.  Popular varieties include ‘Oyster Plant,’ ‘Purple Heart’ and the ‘Silver Inchplant,’ also known as Tradescantia zebrina.

Most varieties of inchplants have succulent-like foliage, often with a purplish hue which can be increased by exposing your plants to brighter light.  Just try to keep your inchplants out of direct light which can cause sunburn.

With leaves in a wide variety of colors and variegation patterns, some inchplants even have a silver coloration which looks particularly appealing.  Boasting long, trailing growth habits, inchplants look nice in hanging baskets and root easily in water as well.

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Jade Plant

Crassula ovata
Crassula Ovata

The ever-popular jade plant comes in many different forms — some with large, flat, ovoid leaves, with or without red margins, and some with more tubular shapes.  A long-living species, jade plants have been recorded to live well over 70 years.

While frequently sold as tabletop plants, older specimens can get quite large and begin to develop woody stems and treelike forms.  Propagating easily in soil or water, jades are one of the best succulents to start out with if you’re unfamiliar with succulents or houseplants in general.

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Kaffir Lily

Clivia miniata
Clivia miniata

Kaffir lily, also known as the bush lily, comes from the woodlands of South Africa and is famous for its attractive bright yellow and orange blooms and long, sweeping, glossy leaves.

Preferring a rich, well-draining potting mix, kaffir lilies generally bloom in mid-winter, approximately around February.  Encourage flowering by reducing watering and allowing your plant to become a bit pot bound.  During winter, when indoor heat is on, increase humidity around your lily with a pebble tray.

Not to be overlooked, as a lily, this beautiful species is highly toxic to cats so avoid keeping this plant if you have a kitty.

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Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana
Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana

Often the easiest kalanchoe variety to find in stores, ‘Flaming Katy,’ as it is often known, has flowers that range from red and orange to yellow and pink, as well as some bi-color options too.

Native to Madagascar, this easy-care succulent prefers to be watered regularly, when the top 2” of soil is dry to the touch, or approximately every ten days.

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Lipstick Plant

Aeschynanthus radicans
Lipstick Plant

With long, trailing, waxy leaves and bright red flowers, lipstick plant is a stunner!  Named for its colorful blooms that are said to resemble tubes of lipstick, if you’re looking for a different sort of plant, the lipstick plant may be your solution.

Native to the humid tropics of southeast Asia, lipstick plants do best in rooms with 50% or higher humidity levels and benefit from a monthly application of organic liquid fertilizer during the growing season.

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Lollipop Plant

Pachystachys Lutea
Pachystachys Lutea

Also known as the golden shrimp plant, cheery lollipop plants boast bright, golden-orange upright flowers that are hard to miss.

Native to Peru, this tropical evergreen shrub grows up to 6’ tall in nature, but stays smaller as a houseplant, rarely growing above 4’ tall.  Requiring high humidity levels of over 65%, be sure to provide this moisture-lover with daily misting to keep it looking fresh.

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Lucky Bamboo

Dracaena sanderiana
Dracaena sanderiana

Able to grow well in both water and soil, lucky bamboo isn’t actually related to bamboo at all, but is actually more closely related to snake plants.

Believed to bring good luck to your home, lucky bamboo is frequently given as a housewarming gift or graduation present and its easygoing nature makes it well-suited for beginning gardeners.  To keep your bamboo happy, just provide it with bright, indirect light and refrain from overfertilizing your plant, which can cause leaf yellowing and scorching.

For a more impressive arrangement, try potting up several lucky bamboo plants together and place them in a tall planter for added appeal.

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Maidenhair Fern

Adiantum spp.
Maidenhair Fern

Maidenhair fern is named for its delicate, lacy foliage that can add a bright, airy feel to any display shelf or hanging basket.

Just as with other ferns, maidenhair ferns prefer consistently moist, but not soggy, soil and higher than normal humidity levels.  Try misting your maidenhair fern regularly or, for a lower maintenance option, pot it up and place it on a pebble tray for that extra boost of humidity.  Requiring regular feeding, only fertilize your fern with diluted, liquid fertilizer to avoid overwhelming your plant.

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Ming Aralia

Polyscias fruticosa
Polyscias fruticosa

With feathery foliage and woody, occasionally bulbous stems, this dwarf tree originally comes from India and is known for its charming shape and glossy leaves.  Preferring consistently moist, not soggy, soil, Ming aralia’s treelike form makes it especially well-suited for bonsai.  Just keep in mind that this humidity-loving species needs at least 50% humidity to keep it growing nicely.

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Money Tree

Pachira aquatica
Pachira aquatica

A tropical tree from the wetlands of Central and South America, money trees are believed to be lucky and are often given as housewarming gifts.

Growing up to 60’ in nature, as houseplants money trees are often sold with braided stems for a more formal look.  Although this plant loves moisture, don’t let its roots sit in soggy soil to prevent root rot.

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Moth Orchid

Phalaenopsis spp.
Moth Orchid (Phalaenopsis spp.)

When most people think of orchids, they think of finicky plants that are difficult to keep.  But that’s not the case with moth orchids.

The most common orchid variety that you’ll find in groceries and garden centers, moth orchids have large, fleshy leaves and colorful blooms in white, pink, red and purple.  Growing as epiphytes in nature, plant up your orchid in a bark-based soil suitable for orchids and mist your plant on occasion as these plants are prone to leaf splitting if humidity levels drop.

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Nerve Plant

Fittonia albivenis
Fittonia albivenis nerve plant

Most commonly found in a silvery-white tone, nerve plants also come in pink and red varieties.  These charming plants are great for terrariums; however, their high humidity needs can make them difficult to keep outside of glass enclosures.

Prone to wilting dramatically in low moisture and low humidity environments, provide your nerve plants with consistently moist, not soggy, soil and humidity levels of above 60%.

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Paddle Plant

Kalanchoe thyrsiflora
Kalanchoe thyrsiflora

Paddle plants, also known as flapjack plants, are collected for their fleshy, rounded leaves that are often a blue-green coloration, although some can be edged in a vibrant red.

An easy-care succulent, paddle plants do best with infrequent but deep watering and should only be watered every few weeks or less.  Prone to legginess, be sure your paddle plant gets lots of bright light.  That said, if your plant gets spindly, try propagating it.  These succulents propagate very easily in soil!

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Parlor Palm

Chamaedorea elegans
Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

Elegant parlor palms first gained popularity in the Victorian era when they were used to bring a bit of color and a tropical feel to sitting rooms.  Today, parlor palms are known to be low maintenance plants that are great for indoor air purification.

Growing up to 12’ tall, parlor palms can adapt to lower light rooms; however, if you notice your palm leaves beginning to brown at the edges, your plant is begging for a bit more water.

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Peace Lily

Spathiphyllum spp.
Peace Lily

Peace lilies are easy care plants featuring lance-shaped, glossy leaves and elegant white flowers.  As lilies, however, these plants should be avoided in any homes with cats as these plants are known to be very toxic to felines.

Prone to wilting if their soil is allowed to dry out, provide your peace lilies with consistently moist, but not soggy, soil and fertilize on occasion with a diluted liquid organic fertilizer.

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Peacock Plant

Calathea makoyana

With attractive, highly-patterned leaves in shades of green with purplish undersides, this showy foliage plant is closely related to the prayer plant.

A native of the tropical forests of Brazil, peacock plants can grow up to 2’ tall and occasionally bloom tiny, purple or white flowers under the right conditions.

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Pencil Cactus

Euphorbia tirucalli
Euphorbia tirucalli

A native of Africa, the pencil cactus is a small shrub or tree that naturally produces a poisonous latex as a line of defense.  A slender houseplant, in nature pencil cacti can live quite long and grow rather woody with age.

As a cactus, this species doesn’t need lots of water and shouldn’t be watered more than once every 10 days during the growing season.  In winter, waterings should be reduced significantly. 

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Persian Shield

Stobilanthes dyerianus
Persian Shield Strobilanthes dyeriana

Persian shields are vibrant plants with a purple coloration that is hard to miss.  Occasionally grown as outdoor specimens, Persian shields really come to life as houseplants, as their attractive coloring can be highlighted best in windows with bright, indirect light.

If you notice your Persian shield beginning to turn brown, lack of humidity or underwatering is likely the cause.  Persian shields do best with consistently moist, not soggy, soil and higher than normal household humidity levels.

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Philodendron

Philodendron spp.
philodendron gloriosum

There are over 400 different species of philodendrons, including vining plants that can grow up to 20’ long and more upright specimens.

Easy to care for, philodendrons have simple needs including bright, indirect light and regular watering.  Just be careful not to allow your philodendron to sit in moisture, which can cause root rot. Vining species of philodendron look quite similar to pothos, look great in hanging baskets and are also easy to propagate in water.

If you want to add a philodendron or two to your collection, consider popular varieties like the ‘Heart Leaf’ or the ‘Velvet Leaf’ philodendron.

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Pitcher Plant

Nepenthes spp.
Pitcher Plant

Pitcher plants, like other carnivorous plant species, grow in nutrient-poor, boggy environments.  In the absence of nutrient-rich soil, these intriguing plants have evolved the ability to trap and digest insects to supplement the nutrients they need.

When kept as houseplants, pitcher plants can naturally help combat annoying pests like fruit flies and houseflies.  Requiring consistently moist, but not soggy, soil, be sure to only water your pitcher plants with distilled or rainwater and don’t fertilize them as they are quite sensitive to chemicals.

To keep your pitcher plants happy, try potting them in a hanging basket and provide them with a little extra humidity to encourage them to produce more pitchers.

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Polka Dot Begonia

Begonia maculata
Begonia Maculata

Often sold as a tabletop plant, gorgeous polka dot begonias can grow quite fast, becoming 4’ tall floor plants in just a few years.  Known for their polka dot leaves, when you flip those leaves over you may be surprised to see the underside features a gorgeous dark red hue.

Propagating easily in water, polka dot begonias, like other begonias, require regular watering schedules and a monthly feeding with a good liquid fertilizer.

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Polka Dot Plant

Hypoestes phyllostachya
Hypoestes phyllostachya

Polka dot plants can be finicky plants to keep unless you do a bit of research.  Requiring higher than normal humidity levels, polka dot plants are prone frequent wilting if their soil is allowed to dry out or if they receive insufficient humidity.

To keep these plants happy, provide consistently moist, but not soggy, soil and consider keeping them near a humidifier or planting them in a terrarium.  With a little know-how, these colorful plants shouldn’t give you any trouble and their patterned foliage, in white, pink, red and green, will bring a unique twist to your collection.

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Ponytail Palm

Beaucarnea Recurvata
Beaucarnea recurvata

With their long, curly leaves atop a quirky, bulbous trunk, ponytail palms look a bit like something straight out of a children’s book.

A native of Mexico, ponytail palms store water in their trunks helping them to resist drought-like conditions.  Highly adaptable as houseplants, ponytail palms are actually succulents related to agaves and so prefer dry soil.  Allow the top 2 to 3” of soil to dry out between waterings and fertilize once a month during the growing season with a balanced organic liquid fertilizer.

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Pothos

Epipremnum aureum
Epipremnum aureum

Also known as “devil’s ivy,” for their nearly indestructible nature, pothos are a great plant for beginners, due to their ease of care and simple requirements.  Capable of growing in a wide range of lighting conditions, from low light to bright, indirect light, pothos are vining plants that grow rapidly, reaching 6 to 10’, and look quite striking when allowed to trail from high shelves or hanging baskets.

Requiring minimal fertilizing and moderate watering, be careful not to let your pothos’ soil get waterlogged as these plants, though hardy, are quite prone to root rot.

Able to be easily propagated in water, pothos come in a wide range of colors and variegation patterns which can add interest to your collection.  If you’re looking to add a pothos to your home, try popular varieties like ‘Marble Queen,’ ‘Jade,’ or ‘Neon’ pothos.

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Prayer Plant

Maranta leuconeura
Maranta leuconeura

Prayer plants are named for their ability to move with sunlight.  During the day, their brightly colored, pink and green leaves lay flat; however, as light fades, their leaves move upwards as if in prayer.

Provide your prayer plants with regular watering and bright, indirect light, as bright light can cause leaf scorching and fading.  Under the right conditions, your prayer plant will bloom tiny purple flowers that add to its allure.

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Purple Shamrock

Oxalis spp.
purple houseplant

If you choose to add purple shamrocks to your collection, be prepared for lots of color!  Known for their deep purple leaves, purple shamrocks also bloom tiny, lavender flowers that are sure to please.

Native to Brazil, purple shamrocks prefer humidity levels around 50% and consistently moist, but not soggy, soil.  If allowed to dry out, your shamrock will wilt dramatically and quickly.  To prevent this, stick to a regular watering schedule and this happy little plant is sure to thrive.

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Rabbit’s Foot Fern

Davallia fejeensis
Davallia fejeensis

The rhizomes of this unique fern are said to resemble the furry feet of a rabbit, and with good reason.  While rabbit’s foot fern looks lovely in a standard pot, displaying it in a hanging basket can help accentuate its unique look and furry rhizomes.

Growing up to 3’ tall, like other ferns, the rabbit’s foot fern does best with consistently moist soil and high humidity levels of between 60 and 90%.  A great candidate for keeping in humid bathrooms, be sure to provide your fern with extra humidity if you decide to place it in a drier bedroom or living room.

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Red Aglaonema

Aglaonema commutatum
Aglaonema commutatum

A variety of Chinese evergreen, this species is valued for its contrasting, bright red and green foliage.  An easy-care plant, red aglaonema is drought tolerant and can adapt to lower light situations; however, due to its leaf coloration, bright indirect light is preferred as insufficient light can cause its characteristic red color to fade.

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Rex Begonia

Begonia rex-cultorum
begonia rex

While there are over 1000 species of begonia, one of the most popular types to keep is the rex begonia.  Smaller than many begonia types, rex begonia maxes out at 18” tall and maintains a tidy, mounding growth habit.  Prized for their patterned foliage, rex begonias come in a range of colors, including silver, purple and red.

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Rubber Plant

Ficus elastica
Ficus elastica

Rubber plants are actually trees that can grow over 100’ tall in their native environment of southeast Asia.  As a houseplant, this hardy species remains much smaller and rarely grows over 10’ tall.

Its Latin name, “elastica” refers to the plant’s white sap, which contains a natural latex, which has been historically used to create rubber. Rubber plants come in both solid green and variegated varieties and their glossy, fleshy leaves benefit from the occasional dusting to maintain their characteristic sheen.

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Shield Aralia

Polyscias scutellaria
Polyscias scutellaria

With slightly woody stems and rounded leaves that come in either solid green or variegated coloring, shield aralias are small, tropical shrubs from the Pacific Islands.

As houseplants, these plants rarely grow above 4’ tall and are often kept as bonsais due to their treelike forms.  Preferring moderate to high humidity levels, place your plant near a humidifier or on a pebble tray to prevent crispy leaves and leaf drop.

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Shingle Plant

Rhaphidophora hayi
Rhaphidophora hayi

A rare, climbing epiphyte, shingle plants can often fetch high prices at plant nurseries and you may have to do a bit of digging to find one, unless you opt to order online.

Frequently sold attached to a board, shingle plants are vines; however, they have a different growth habit from other vining species.  With flat growing leaves, in nature shingle plants grow flat and pressed against tree bark for support and may need an extra bit of care as houseplants.

A native of the warm, humid rainforests of Queensland and New Guinea, shingle plants should be kept away from cold drafts and provided with at least 70% humidity levels.

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Silver Dollar Vine

Xerosicyos danguyi
Xerosicyos danguyi

An unusual, climbing succulent, the silver dollar vine is known for its trailing stems that sport round, silver-toned, fleshy leaves.

A slow-growing plant, silver dollar vines require more water than most succulents and do best when watered approximately once a week or when the top 1” of soil is dry to the touch.

To make your plant really shine, try potting it up in a hanging basket or trellising its vines upward for a more vertical look.

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Snake Plant

Dracaena trifasciata
Dracaena trifasciata

Snake plants come in several different shapes and sizes, some with solid green leaves, some with striping and some with cylindrical leaves.

As a succulent, snake plants tend to thrive on neglect and require infrequent, but thorough, watering.  Snake plants should be watered once a month or even less and soil should be allowed to dry out completely between waterings.

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Spider Plant

Chlorophytum comosum
Chlorophytum comosum

Spider plants are one of the easiest houseplants to keep so, if you’re just starting out on your houseplant journey, why not pick up a spider plant or two?

Coming in solid green and variegated varieties, spider plants do best with a regular watering schedule, which for most areas amounts to a weekly watering.

Known for their ability to rapidly reproduce, when spider plants are happy, they will begin to bloom tiny, white flowers which will grow into baby spider plants, known as “spiderettes.”  Simply snip off and pot up any spiderettes you see, and you’ll have plenty more plants to add to your collection or share with friends.

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Staghorn Fern

Platycerium spp.
Preparing to Mount Staghorn Fern on Board

With their oddly shaped, fleshy leaves, staghorn ferns are said to resemble the horns of a stag.  This comparison is only strengthened when staghorn ferns are hung from walls on wooden wall mounts, which make for easy DIY projects for home gardeners who like to craft.

Requiring humidity levels of 70% or higher, staghorn ferns will require a little extra care to ensure they receive adequate moisture, but they are well worth the investment.  To keep your plants growing strong, allow your fern’s substrate to dry out between waterings.

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String of Bananas

Curio radicans
Curio radicans

A popular trailing succulent with oblong leaves that are said to resemble bananas, string of bananas looks great in a hanging basket, which will highlight its long, delicate growth habit.

Native to the arid regions of South Africa, string of bananas tolerate normal household humidity levels and do best when their soil is allowed to dry out between waterings.  Prone to growing rather spindly in low light situations, provide your plant with lots of bright, indirect sunlight to keep it looking its best.

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String of Dolphins

Senecio peregrinus
String of dolphin plant Senecio peregrinus

Another trailing succulent with a unique look, string of dolphins’ leaves are said to resemble tiny dolphins in mid-jump. Growing vines that can measure 3’ in length, keep your string of dolphins in a hanging basket or allow it to drape delicately from a high shelf for maximum effect.

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String of Pearls

Senecio rowleyanus
Senecio rowleyanus

While there are several popular trailing succulent varieties, string-of-pearls is often the most sought after.  Featuring fleshy, globular leaves, string-of-pearls stores water quite well and does best with a thorough watering once every two weeks.

Unlike other trailing succulents, string-of-pearls prefers slightly higher humidity levels, so consider hanging this species near a humidifier or in a steamy, brightly lit bathroom for optimal growth.

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String of Turtles

Peperomia prostrata
String of Turtles (Peperomia prostata)

Despite its similar appearance to other trailing succulents, string of turtles is actually more closely related to the watermelon peperomia and UFO plant.

With leaves veined in highly contrasting white and green, string of turtles is a delicate looking plant that looks particularly nice in a hanging basket.  Preferring 50% or higher humidity, be sure to spritz your plant down from time to time with a bit of water to prevent browning leaves and leaf drop.

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Stromanthe Triostar

Stromanthe sanguinea
Stromanthe sanguinea

The attractive pink, green and white foliage of stromanthe triostar may have you believing this beauty is a high-maintenance plant, but that’s not the case.  Well-adapted to average household conditions, this plant prefers a bit of humidity and regular and consistent waterings.

A relative of the prayer plant, stromanthe’s colorful leaves fold upwards at night, making this a particularly interesting plant to keep.  Found in the rainforests of Brazil, this fast-growing species may just become one of your favorite plants if you can find one!

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Swedish Ivy

Plecranthus verticillatus
Swedish ivy Plecranthus verticillatus

Swedish ivy is known for its bright green leaves with serrated margins and its quirky, trailing growth habit.  An easy-care plant, Swedish ivy is quite forgiving of most situations, tolerates normal household humidity levels, grows fast and propagates easily in water.  What’s not to love?

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Sweetheart Plant

Hoya kerrii
Hoya kerrii

A close relative of the wax plant, sweetheart hoya is an adorable vining plant that is known for its heart-shaped leaves.  As with other hoyas, sweetheart plants store water in their waxy leaves, making them somewhat drought resistant.

Sweetheart plants really come alive when they begin to bloom their fragrant flowers.  Just be advised, if you find one of these plants in your local nursery, look for plants with more than one leaf.  Sweetheart plants with single leaves are rooted leaves, not full plants, and will never vine or grow larger.

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Swiss Cheese Plant

Monstera deliciosa
monstera varieties

Wildly popular monsteras look like the tropics with big, bold, glossy leaves and a sprawling growth habit.  At times quite massive, monsteras can grow up to 15’ tall and spread over 8’ in diameter as houseplants, so make sure you have room!

Despite their impressive look, monsteras are easy to care for plants that root well in water and can adapt to a wide range of household conditions, including normal household humidity levels.  That said, humidity levels above 60% will make your plant much happier.

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Sword Fern

Polystichum munitum
Polystichum munitum

Native to western North America, this common fern can grow quite large, often reaching up to 6’ tall!  With dark green, leafy fronds, sword ferns can be a stunning addition to any room, adding vibrant color and a traditional and elegant feel.

Simply provide your plant with lots of humidity and fertilize on occasion with half-strength, diluted liquid fertilizer, and you’ll have a lush plant that is great at air purification too.

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Ti plant

Cordyline fruticosa
Cordyline fruticosa

A member of the asparagus family, ti plant is an evergreen flowering plant that is naturally found in New Zealand and the Pacific Islands.

Known for its bright, lance-shaped leaves in pinks and a range of greens, ti plants can grow over 15’ tall and occasionally bloom in summer with white, pink or lavender flowers that mature into berries.  Keep in mind, however, that those berries aren’t edible!

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UFO Plant

Pilea peperomiodes
Pilea peperomiodes

Also known as the “pancake plant” or “Chinese money plant,” UFO plants are popular, easy-care specimens that feature glossy, fleshy leaves in a characteristic circular shape.  Closely related to watermelon peperomias, UFO plants do best with consistent watering schedules and can benefit from the addition of a calcium-rich fertilizer on occasion to prevent leaf deformation.

Prone to self-propagation, when left unchecked, UFO plants will make lots of baby plants for you to share with friends and family.

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Umbrella Tree

Schefflera actinophylla
Schefflera actinophylla

Umbrella trees have pretty, fan-shaped leaves that can either be solid green or variegated green and white.  Growing up to 8 to 10’ tall when kept as houseplants, these plants are naturally found in the rainforests of Australia where they can grow up to 40’ in height!

Prone to leaf drop when underwatered, try to provide your umbrella tree with regular, consistent watering and you’ll have a gorgeous plant that will be the star of your collection for many years to come.

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Urn Plant

Aechmea fasciata
Aechmea Fasciata

A native of Brazil, urn plants are a type of bromeliad known for their patterned, variegated leaves and big, bold and beautiful pink blooms.  Like other bromeliads, urn plants only bloom once in their lifetime and die back afterwards; however, they will often produce “pups” for the next generation.

Urn plants prefer approximately 50% humidity levels and tend to lose their variegation in low light, so make sure you place your plant in a window that receives a good six to eight hours of bright, indirect light.

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Velvet Plant

Gynura aurantiaca
Gynura aurantiaca

If you love vibrant plants, you can’t go wrong with velvet plants, which are also known as “purple passion” plants for their purple foliage.  With fuzzy leaves and tiny, golden-orange flowers, velvet plants are in the daisy family.  Tending towards a vining growth habit, velvet plants can benefit from frequent pruning to keep them growing in a more upright shape.

Velvet plants root easily in water, so try propagating some cuttings after pruning your plant.  As velvet plants are relatively short-lived, living only two to three years, you can keep your plants going indefinitely by continuously rooting cuttings.

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Venus Fly Trap

Dionaea muscipula
Dionaea muscipula venus fly trap

If you like funky plants, try a Venus fly trap for a change.  These oddball, little carnivorous plants are naturally found in the nutrient-poor bogs of the coastal Carolinas, where they supplement the nutrients they need by eating flies and other small insects.

If you want to keep Venus fly traps at home, be sure to provide them with bright, indirect light and relatively high humidity levels of above 50%.  Well-suited for terrariums, Venus fly traps are sensitive to chemicals so only pot them in a carnivorous plant potting mix, never fertilize them and only water them with distilled or rain water.

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Warneckii Dracaena

Dracaena deremensis
Dracaena deremensis

With nicely contrasting foliage in shades of green, this pretty dracaena is closely related to the corn plant dracaena.  Preferring consistent moisture levels, if your plant’s leaves begin to brown a little at the margins, it’s likely a sign that your plant could benefit from a little extra humidity.  To keep your plant growing strong, fertilize it monthly with a good, organic liquid fertilizer.

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Watermelon Peperomia

Peperomia argyreia
watermelon peperomia

Watermelon peperomia’s fleshy, highly contrasting foliage is said to resemble the skin of watermelons and they do add a bit of fun flair to any collection.

Preferring consistently moist, but not soggy, soil, this species can benefit from a little supplemental calcium from time to time, especially if their leaves begin to look a little deformed.  Simply crush some eggshells and brew them overnight to make an easy, calcium-rich tea.  Your peperomia will thank you for it!

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Wax Begonia

Begonia semperflorens
Begonia semperflorens

A frequent sight at local nurseries, wax begonias may be a common houseplant, but that doesn’t detract from their charm.  With pretty, little blooms in white, pinks and reds, these begonias are known for their fleshy leaves that shine slightly in the light.

Frequently grown as outdoor annuals, wax begonias do well as houseplants too, just provide them with a regular watering schedule and consider misting them on occasion as they enjoy a little extra humidity.

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Wax Plant

Hoya carnosa
Hoya carnosa

Hoyas come in many shapes and sizes, with popular varieties including ‘Hoya tricolor’ (with pink, white and green variegated leaves) and the ‘Hindu rope plant’ (which is known for its foliage’s twisted form).

With thick, waxy leaves that are useful for moisture retention, hoyas can withstand some periods of drought; however, they prefer regular watering schedules.  When properly maintained, hoyas will produce large, fragrant blooms.

Hoyas can grow quite large so consider trellising your plant to optimize growth. 

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Weeping Fig

Ficus benjamina
Ficus benjamina

Weeping figs are grown as dwarf trees when kept indoors, although they can reach 60’ in height in nature.  These evergreen perennials are known for their glossy, ovoid leaves and occasionally are sold with braided trunks for added visual interest.

Known to be a bit finicky, weeping figs will drop their leaves if unhappy or if their environment changes rapidly so, try to stick to a uniform watering schedule and avoid exposing these plants to fluctuating temperatures and humidity levels.

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Zebra Plant

Haworthiopsis fasciata
Haworthiopsis Fasciata

If you like the look of aloes, but you have pets and want to avoid any toxic houseplants in your home, haworthia are great options.

Named for their striped, highly contrasting foliage, zebra plants are easy care succulents that prefer infrequent watering.  Highly structural in shape, zebra plants will reach 5 to 8” in height when fully mature.

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ZZ Plant

Zamioculcas zamiifolia
Zamioculcas Zamiifolia

It’s hard to go wrong with ZZ plants.  These super easy-care succulents originally hail from eastern Africa but have evolved to handle a wide range of conditions, including low light.  ZZ plants also prefer infrequent waterings, ideally every month or less, so they are a great choice for gardeners with a more “hands-of” approach.

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