15 Awesome Echeveria Types (With Pictures)

With their variety of rosettes, from plump to thin and flat to round and sometimes fuzzy, almost everyone has enjoyed the sight of an Echeveria. This genus gets its name from the 19th-century botanical illustrator, Anastasio Echeverría.

These succulents, often from Mexico, are wonderful companions to any patio or sunny window. If you’re not sure which kind you’d like to go with, here are some top picks that will wow, whether they’re rare or common!

Tip: If you’re having trouble identifying your Echeveria, you can try our plant identification tool that lets you upload a photo and get instant results!.


Common Types of Echeveria

Here are some of the most common types of Echeveria. These are the species that you’re most likely to find at the local plant store:

Echeveria leucotricha (Chenille Plant)

The plush plant (Echeveria leucotricha, Echeveria pulvinata).

These two species look very similar, enough to share a nickname. Found nearly anywhere Echeveria are sold, these Chenille Plants form plump, fluffy leaves that delight any succulent keeper!

E. leucotricha, the much hairier of the two, will stay much more compact with straighter, more plump leaves at only 6 inches tall. E. leucotricha also features brown or red-tipped leaves, with some colorful varieties being entirely red or purple.

E. pulvinata, the Plush plant, will produce flatter, wider leaves with a little less hair and reach up to a slightly larger 12 inches. These leaves may sometimes produce less hair but are usually very plush and soft. Often a brighter lime green, E. pulvinata can produce red-edged leaves with enough sunlight, earning it the nickname ‘Ruby Slippers’!

Both plants are wonderful choices for someone looking for a fun, fluffy succulent!

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or west facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water when the soil dries completely, then fully drench. Do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot once a year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily from leaf cuttings. Forms prolific offsets.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, spider mites, fungus gnats, and scale.

Echeveria nodulosa (Painted Echeveria)

Echeveria nodulosa

This easy-to-find succulent is anything but plain. The Painted Echeveria features beautiful deep green rosettes and stems decorated with vivid red lines. This attention-grabbing plant grows erect rosettes up to 5 inches wide that can stand up to 2 feet tall in clumps up to 3 feet wide.

Echeveria nodulosa can stand out in any arrangement just as well as it creates its own complete display.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or west facing window receiving as much light as possible. Prefers temperatures between 65 and 75°F.
  • Water occasionally until established, then only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix with loam and sand.
  • Repot when needed, during the warmer temperatures.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily with leaf and stem cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria lilacina (Ghost Echeveria)

Echeveria lilacina

For a succulent with fantastic shades of pale purples, the Ghost Echeveria runs through a spectrum of colors throughout the year. In the spring, it can produce red stems with fragrant flowers in shades of pink. Most of the year, it will be a silver-gray color with deeper lavender colors under more intense lighting. Upon reaching fall, its leaves will change into a beautiful lilac.

Ghost Echeveria demands attention with slow-growing rosettes that can grow up to 12 inches across. Under ideal conditions, it can reach up to 10 inches tall, though it usually tops out at 6 inches tall.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Brighter light makes more purple leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or west facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water occasionally until established, then only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot only in the spring once offsets are produced.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 10a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates rarely with offsets.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately. Remove any offsets and replant them.
  • Experience: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs and root mealybugs, fungus gnats, spider mites, scale insects, and aphids.

Echeveria peacockii (Peacock Echeveria)

Echeveria peacockii

The Peacock Echeveria features a surprising amount of color and is a fantastic choice for a plant-keeper without a lot of sunlight available who would love to see more colors.

The Peacock is known for its deep blue foliage with red-tipped leaves. For additional color, it produces flowers in the summer in a contrasting orange-red.

This sun-shy succulent grows to just six inches in diameter and just shy of six inches tall indoors. Outdoors, it can grow to nearly a foot tall and a little wider.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, morning sun and partial shade. Indoors, any window not receiving direct light from the full, afternoon sun. This is a mild climate species.
  • Water occasionally until established, then only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily with leaf or stem cuttings and year-long offsets.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately. Clip offsets away from the mother plant during the spring.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria subrigida ‘Fire and Ice’

Echeveria subrigida
FarOutFlora, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

This fascinating succulent has dusty, silvery blue leaves blushed with red nearly all season long. ‘Fire and Ice’ is a cultivar of E. subrigida which has smaller leaves with a paler blush forming rosettes up to 9 inches wide. Fire and Ice, on the other hand, is known for being huge! Up to 20 inches wide and, in some cases, a foot tall, it almost resembles a tropical plant with its thin, pointed rosettes.

Fire and Ice is also favored for its multi-colored show of flowers in the late spring to early summer.

This eye-catching plant is a fantastic choice for rock gardens!

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, morning sun and partial shade. Indoors, the brightest window available. Move the plant if it burns, as its burns will not heal.
  • Water occasionally until established, then only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates most commonly with seeds, but leaf propagation is sometimes successful.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Rare and Interesting Echeveria Types

Here are a few of rarer Echeveria types that also easy to keep:

Echeveria ‘Raindrops’

Echeveria ‘Raindrops’

Like many rare Echeveria, this is a hybrid plant.

Raindrops has a fascinating growth near the end of each leaf resembling a raindrop. As it continues to age, these small growths will become fuller and more noticeable. In the cooler months, the edges of its leaves and drops will develop shades of red hues.

This is a small succulent reaching only 6 inches wide and tall.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or east facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water occasionally until established, then only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Despite its name, avoid getting rosettes wet. Dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot once it outgrows its current container or every couple of years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily with leaf cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner. Praised for being indestructible.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs.

Echeveria agavoides ‘Romeo Rubin

Echeveria agavoides ‘Romeo Rubin’

For a truly incredible variety, take a look at Romeo Rubin.

This rare variety catches attention and fame for its unusually intense red! Unlike painted ones found in stores, Romeo Rubin really is the unusual reds it displays. This slow-growing variety reaching just 6 inches tall and about a foot wide is happy to be treated like any Echeveria, making it a very easy to care for plant—if you can get your hands on one.

Echeveria agavoides is a common Echeveria requiring common Echeveria care without notable exception. It features more triangular and pointed Agave-like leaves than most rounded Echeveria.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or west facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water occasionally until established, then only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, gritty succulent mix.
  • Repot when needed, during warmer temperatures.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily with leaf and stem cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria imbricata var. (Compton Carousel)

Echeveria Compton Carousel

These beauties are becoming increasingly popular while retaining their rare status!

Compton Carousel is a variegated rosette with a light green strip from the base of each leaf to the very tip. These tips are often pink. The plant will “blush” under the stress of cool weather or intense sun, causing the edges of the leaves to show pink and red hues.

This head turner grows in clumps with rosettes up to 6 inches wide and less than 6 inches tall.

It’s important to know this variety is known for being quite the demanding lady and unusually difficult to care for, developing rot or simply declining for minor mistakes.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Bright, indirect light. Does not handle heat.
  • Water only once the soil dries and only enough to make the soil damp. Keep a close eye during warm weather.
  • The soil mix should be a high quality gritty, well-draining mix.
  • Repot when needed, during warmer temperatures.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 10a-11b. Best kept indoors or in a greenhouse.
  • Propagates with offshoots. Only remove offshoots by top cutting once they have rooted. Most offshoots will not take off.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves as soon as they die. This plant does well with weak fertilizer monthly in late spring through early summer.
  • Experience level: Advanced. This is a very fragile plant.
  • Susceptible to rot, mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria ‘Psyche’

These sweet, colorful succulents are hybrids born in Korea. Many specimens are found online and are rare no matter where you source them.

In most conditions, Psyche looks like any given E. agavoides, with fleshy, pointed leaves tipped with red. Under the stress such as cold temperatures and intense heat, Psyche develops gorgeous red and pink hues lauded for their resemblance to fall colors!

Not a lot is known about this unusual species, but it seems to do well with regular Echeveria care.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or west facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting leaves wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, gritty succulent mix.
  • Repot once it outgrows its pot or every couple of years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 10a-11b. Usually kept indoors or in a greenhouse.
  • Propagates with leaf cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria lauii ‘Pink’

While Echeveria lauii isn’t too hard to find and is adorable on its own, the ‘Pink’ cultivar is taking gardener’s hearts by storm. Its plump, pink rosettes retain the E. lauii’s dusty coating, which is very sensitive. Admirers should not touch the leaves as it will leave imprints.

Whether you have the more common E. lauii or the rare ‘Pink’ cultivar, this is a truly adorable plant that will make anyone stop for a second look.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or east facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water only when the soil dries completely. Water from the bottom only. Dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot once it outgrows its current container or every couple of years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates. Often kept as a houseplant.
  • Propagates most easily through seeds. Leaves taken during repotting may root, but it is difficult.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately. Avoid touching the leaves as the dusty bloom will take on fingerprints.
  • Experience level: Intermediate.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs.

Visually Stunning Echeveria Species

These Echeveria species are know for their unique and stunning displays:

Echeveria affinis (Black Knight)

This somewhat common succulent is celebrated for its intensely dark foliage that grows from dark green into purple-black. Often touted as a succulent gift for men, it will truly be at home with any plant keeper!

This plant makes a wonderful contrast in succulent arrangements and rock gardens and keeps to a tidy maximum size of 6 inches wide and up to 5 inches tall. This plant is very easy to keep!

E. affinis has also been crossed with E. shaviana to produce ‘Black Prince,’ another deep purple-black rosette that looks fantastic in a rock garden and keeps a small stature.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or east facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot once it outgrows its current container or every couple of years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily with leaf cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Intermediate.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs.

Echeveria runyonii ‘Topsy Turvy’

Topsy Turvey echeveria

This mutant form gone cultivar is best known for its “upside-down” leaves, which have an indent causing the leaves to tent. It has taken warm climate gardeners by storm with the fun texture and large size it adds to a garden!

Topsy Turvy will reach up to 8 inches tall and 10 inches wide. In late summer to early fall, it produces orange star-shaped blooms.

There is some disagreement over whether Topsy Turvy should be grown indoors. It does fabulously as an outdoor plant in warm climates.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, full sun where it is shaded from the heat of afternoon sun. Indoors, the brightest window available. Move the plant if it burns, as its burns will not heal.
  • Water only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Minimal to no watering during the winter. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, gritty succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 7b-10. Kept as an annual or overwinter indoors in cooler climates.
  • Propagates most easily with offsets pulled in the spring. It will also propagate from leaf and stem cuttings as well as seed.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria lutea (Yellow Echeveria)

Echeveria lutea
Michael Wolf, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Yellow Echeveria may be named for its head-turning yellow flowers, but it is just as eye-catching for its curled leaves which form a hollow needle. Since the underside of the leaves is often a different shade from the top, it develops a bi-color look due to the contrast in unrolling.

With water stress or heat, its leaves will take on deep purple and red hues. If it doesn’t have enough light, the leaves will unfurl completely and become a paler green.

This plant is small and compact, not quite reaching 6 inches wide producing tiny, yellow flowers on an inflorescence. It makes a wonderful rock garden companion.

Care

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, partial sun or shade, may handle full sun in temperate climates. Indoors, bright light. Keep shaded for flatter, greener leaves.
  • Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet. This plant will do best watered regularly in the growing season but still needs its soil to dry slightly before watering again.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b, but its full range is not established. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates most commonly with seeds or by removing offsets.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Intermediate.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria ‘Cubic Frost’

Echeveria ‘Cubic Frost’

Much like the Echeveria runyonii ‘Topsy Turvy’, the Cubic Frost sports upturned leaves. However, this hybrid also has silvery, powdery leaves and blushes hues of pinks.

Not only is Cubic Frost—PPAF (plant patent applied for) itself—an attractive plant all on its own, there are many varieties of Cubic Frost, quite a few patented or patent pending as well! One variety, the Cubic Frost Cristata, is a crowned purple Cubic Frost.

This is a fairly large Echeveria at up to 10 inches in diameter and 8 inches tall once matured.

No matter what variety of Cubic Frost you happen to find, it will be colorful and attractive to any passerby!

Care

  • Lighting requirements:
    • Outdoors: morning sun shaded from the hot afternoon, may handle full sun in temperate climates.
    • Indoors: bright light.
  • Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet. This plant does best with infrequent watering.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates most commonly with leaf cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria ‘Blue Curls’

Echeveria ‘Blue Curls’
stephen boisvert from Chicago, United States, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Looking for a little drama on a really unusual succulent? For an Echeveria, ‘Blue Curls’ is your girl.

There’s a lot of debate and mystery as to the history of this mysterious hybrid. Its creator hasn’t been pinned down and has several suspected parents. The best guess for what it’s a hybrid of is that it may involve Echeveria gibbiflora and a sister seedling to the similar Echeveria ‘Blue Waves.’ At this time, it’s not for sure where this hybrid originated from.

In the garden, where none of that matters, this is a unique succulent almost resembling a multi-colored head of kale! It will grow up to 10 inches wide boasting pinks and blues in large, frilly rosettes. It is a wonderful accompaniment to any garden!

Care

  • Lighting requirements:
    • Outdoors: full sun to partial shade. Should be protected from the hot afternoon sun.
    • Indoors: bright light.
  • Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates best from leaf cuttings and any offsets that appear.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.